A Midwinter Midsummer

So far in 2018 I’ve seen four Shakespeare productions and I’ve written about none of them! The first three were all good Shakespeare shows with top quality actors and clear staging. If my goal in watching ten million Shakespeare shows a year is just to watch plays that tell the story really well then all of the shows succeeded. But I like watching Shakespeare that makes me see the story and the characters differently and The Chekhov Collective’s Midsummer Night’s Dream made me think about the play differently.

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Elizabeth Saunders as Egeus/Puck. Photos from Chekhov Collective.

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Much Ado About Assistant Directing

What did I learn while assistant directing? A deceptively simple question.

Now I love Shakespeare but it’s a complicated relationship that is by no means perfect. There are a lot of things about Shakspeare’s plays that I find difficult to deal with. Part of the reason that I enjoy productions where the context is adapted is because it provides some wiggle room about what is highlighted within the play which can create a more diverse and innovative interpretation. Not that I don’t enjoy a good traditional show sometimes too.

So before I had even moved to Toronto and began my MA, I saw that Hart House was putting on a production of Much Ado About Nothing and from the poster I could decipher that it was going to be sets in the 1940s. I had lots of reasons for applying to assistant direct but two of the most prominent were that I wanted to learn directing techniques and I wanted to be a part of the process of working on a Shakespeare show (especially one set in a different time period).

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Photography by Scott Gorman. Much Ado About Nothing directed by Carly Chamberlain.

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A Pericles For The Women

Pericles, Prince of Tyre is not a Shakespearean play that is staged often. It is incredibly complicated with fast location changes and the story passes through decades. It also includes a mixture of plotlines found within other Shakespeare stories such as pirates, reuniting families, bringing back someone thought to be dead … It’s a big melting pot of different plotlines. The complexity of the plot is what makes it a big task to make sense of.

Scott Wentworth was the director for this production titled The Adventures of Pericles. I have seen him act in many plays years over the years from Banquo to Shylock but this was my first time seeing a show he has directed so I was excited. I think the strongest element throughout the show was the double (triple?) casting of Antiochus’ daughter, Thaisa, and Marina. They are all played by the ever charming Deborah Hay who travels through these women’s stories to teach us about their individual strength.

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Photography by David Hou. Deborah Hay (Marina) and Evan Buliung (Pericles).

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Performing Shrew

Back in 2015, I missed out on the opportunity to see Stratford’s Taming of the Shrew but on July 31st CBC allowed people like me to see the filmed version. It is a part of their initiative to make arts more available to those who may otherwise be unable to see them in person. This version stars married actors Deborah Hay and Ben Carlson and was directed by Chris Abraham. The Stratford show could be seen as two extremes coming together to meet in the middle. Katherine and Petruchio shed their performed behaviours and find truthfulness in their love.

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Photography by David Hou.

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An All’s Well That Keeps Fighting

I recently went to see Shakespeare in High Park’s production of All’s Well That Ends Well (directed by Ted Witzel). I was so excited to see this show because, not only does SiHP put on a fun show, but this is a Shakespeare show that is rarely done. It is a complex, dark comedy and includes an ending that ends ‘well’ but leaves you questioning whether that is good enough. It places you in a world where people have the right and the ability to determine whether you are worthy or not.

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A picture I took of the preshow stage

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Our Every Day Witches: Macbeth

Antoni Cimolino’s Macbeth could be considered a traditional Macbeth by setting it in the 11th century. But this is a production that goes bump in the night and carries with it an air of mystery similar to an old monster movie. The feeling of the show reminds me of Ichabod Crane’s Sleepy Hollow or the village terrorized by Frankenstein’s monster. This is the world of the weird sisters. The forest they inhabit extends over the Festival stage. The forest remains a key focus even when the characters are in Macbeth’s castle, which seems to suggest the witches never truly leave Macbeth’s presence.

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Photography by David Hou.
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